A century hence

Inthe Americans wrestled with Spain to win the Philippines, and eventually took over the country.

The Philippines a century hence

To wipe out the nation altogether would require the sacrifice of thousands of Spanish soldiers, and this is something Spain would not allow. Deterioration and disappearance of Filipino indigenous culture — when Spain came with the sword and the cross, it began the gradual destruction of the native Philippine culture.

They began to explore other horizons through which they could move towards progress. The family as a unit of society was neglected, and overall, every aspect of the life of the Filipino was retarded.

It is one of the most significant political works of the Filipino Reform movement in SpainRizal tracing the circumstances that brought about the awakening of the Filipino and consequently the birth of the Filipino spirit of a nation.

This was in fulfillment of what he had written in his essay: Theirs was a reign of democracy and liberty. One question Rizal raises in this essay is whether or not Spain can indeed prevent the progress of the Philippines: What she needs to do is to change her colonial policies so that they are in keeping with the needs of the Philippine society and to the rising nationalism of the people.

One of the two had to yield and succumb. Passivity and submissiveness to the A century hence colonizers — one of the most powerful forces that influenced a culture of silence among the natives were the Spanish friars.

The question then arises as to what had awakened the hearts and opened the minds of the Filipino people with regards to their plight. Louis, three hundred miles out, With dishes delicious and rare; There were venison, and turkey, and salmon, and trout, With pine-apple, orange and pear.

Above me in splendor, surpassing the moon, A disk, in the heavens gave light; And neighboring orbs gave the brightness of noon, And scattered the darkness of night.

National consciousness had still awakened, and great Filipino minds still emerged from the rubble. Spain, therefore, had no means to stop the progress of the country. The question then arises as to what had awakened the hearts and opened the minds of the Filipino people with regards to their plight.

The Filipino race was able to survive amidst wars and famine, and became even more numerous after such catastrophes. Eventually, the natives realized that such oppression in their society by foreign colonizers must no longer be tolerated.

This essay, published in La Solidaridad starts by analyzing the various causes of the miseries suffered by the Filipino people: This was in fulfillment of what he had written in his essay: Exterminating the people as an alternative to hindering progress did not work either.

To wipe out the nation altogether would require the sacrifice of thousands of Spanish soldiers, and this is something Spain would not allow. He ends his article with a prediction on the possible political intervention of European or neighboring powers or even that of the United States of America should the Philippines declare itself independent from Spain.

Eventually, the natives realized that such oppression in their society by foreign colonizers must no longer be tolerated. Rizal felt that it was time to remind Spain that the circumstances that ushered in the French Revolution could have a telling effect for her in the Philippines.

Because of this, the Filipinos started losing confidence in their past and their heritage, became doubtful of their present lifestyle, and eventually lost hope in the future and the preservation of their race.

The family as a unit of society was neglected, and overall, every aspect of the life of the Filipino was retarded. Poverty became more rampant than ever, and farmlands were left to wither.

But more than a warning, the article is a sensible request of an affectionate son who sincerely wishes to avoid a bloody separation between Spain and the Philippines. This essay, published in La Solidaridad starts by analyzing the various causes of the miseries suffered by the Filipino people: An order for supper, by telephone, now, Had scarcely been made, by my host, When in sprang a servant, I cannot tell how, With coffee, ham, biscuit and toast.

What she needs to do is to change her colonial policies so that they are in keeping with the needs of the Philippine society and to the rising nationalism of the people.

In the midst, at St.

Spain is being given a sort of ultimatum: Because of this, the Filipinos started losing confidence in their A century hence and their heritage, became doubtful of their present lifestyle, and eventually lost hope in the future and the preservation of their race.

Keeping he people impoverished also came to no avail. He dismisses that possibility, given the existence of other more enticing economic prospects. What Rizal had envisioned in his essay came true. Keeping the people uneducated and ignorant had failed.A Century Hence By: Arja Kitane, Pauline Aningat, Ruth Patricio Translated to English by Charles E.

Derbyshire Originally written in Spanish as “ Filipinas de cien años” Was first published in Madrid, between September 30, – Feb.1, “The Philippines a Century Hence” is an essay written by Philippine national hero Jose Rizal to forecast the future of the country within a hundred years.

Rizal felt that it was time to remind Spain that the circumstances that ushered in the French Revolution. THE PHILIPPINES A CENTURY HENCE 71 The press free in the Philippines, because their complaints rarely ever reach the Peninsula, very rarely, and if they do they are so secret, so mysterious, that no newspaper dares to pub- lish them, or if it does reproduce them, it does so tardily and badly.

“The Philippines a Century Hence” is an essay written by Philippine national hero Jose Rizal to forecast the future of the country within a hundred years. Rizal felt that it was time to remind Spain that the circumstances that ushered in the French Revolution could have a telling effect for her in the Philippines.

“The Philippines a Century Hence” is an essay written by national hero Jose Rizal to forecast the future of the country.

hundred years. Rizal felt that it was time to remind Spain circumstances that ushered in the French Revolution could have. The Philippines a century hence [José Rizal] on mint-body.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

This is a reproduction of a book published before This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages5/5(2).

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